Department of Music

Department of Music

The Department of Music is a community of scholars, creators, and performers dedicated to exploring music’s past, present, and future.

Through multiple modes of inquiry and experience, the department advances new ways of understanding music as both creative expression and cultural practice throughout the world. The department promotes musical education, research, and engagement at the highest standards of excellence on an open and inclusive basis.

About

The Department of Music is a community of scholars, creators, and performers dedicated to exploring music’s past, present, and future.

Academics

Music Making

The Department of Music at Brown offers a huge array of performing opportunities, all available for academic credit.

Students may choose to join one of the department's many performing groups
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Students seeking to improve their playing or singing ability have the option of taking individual private lessons with about thirty professional musicians from the greater Boston-Providence area.
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Recent News

Wang Lu’s “Surge,” given its world premiere at the top of the show, is the product of an initiative by the League of American Orchestras to commission new works from six composers — all women — that will be guaranteed performances from ensembles across the country.
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“Listening In” is a column dedicated to sound, music, and listening practices in contemporary art and its spaces. This section focuses on how listening practices are being investigated and reconfigured by artists working across disciplines in the twenty-second century. The latest episode of "Listening In" is dedicated to C/D, an artistic duo comprising sound designer, installation artist, and Brown University PhD candidate Kamari Carter and artist, composer, and writer Julian Day. After meeting at Columbia University and having worked individually on audio dispersal, the two started to collaborate, focusing their practice and research around ambiguities of surveillance and sousveillance and the complex ethics of broadcasting and listening.
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Upcoming Performances and Lectures